Refining housing, husbandry and care for animals used in studies involving biotelemetry

This paper explains how welfare and science can be improved by avoiding or minimising the potential harms associated with telemetry.
Biotelemetry, the remote detection and measurement of an animal's function or activity, is widely used in animal research. Biotelemetry devices transmit physiological or behavioural data and may be surgically implanted into animals, or externally attached. This can help to reduce animal numbers and improve welfare, e.g., if animals can be group housed and move freely instead of being tethered to a recording device. However, biotelemetry can also cause pain and distress to animals due to surgery, attachment, single housing and long term laboratory housing. This article explains how welfare and science can be improved by avoiding or minimising these harms.

Published in Animals (2014) vol. 4(2), 361-373.
This page was updated on 04 March 2019

Did you find what you were looking for?

Yes, I found it! No, I did not!

Thanks for your feedback! Please note that we cannot respond unless you supply your email address.

What are you looking for?

Please give us your feedback so we can improve the information on the page. Thank you in advance for your help. Please add your email address if you would like a reply.

Please contact us by email if you have any questions.

Thanks for your feedback! Please note that we cannot respond unless you supply your email address.



 

Abonnér på nyhetsbrevene fra Norecopa